News

Minorities Build Businesses by Building Relationships

While many small companies try unsuccessfully for years to nab large contracts, Power's human capital management and technology services company won a government assignment one month after it opened its doors in 2003, thanks to a personal contact, Powers said.

Special Report on Minority Owned Businesses

After 17 years of fits and starts, LeNardo Nelson Sr. of Chicago is ready to take his triple-sided windshield wiper to market. A commercial lender at Harris Bank by day, Nelson has long dreamed of being an inventor like his father, who devised a sled with convertible wheels in the mid-1960s. But getting his wipers off the ground has taken far longer than Nelson ever imagined.

Recession Buster: Company radiates new sales

With a "no layoffs" pledge to employees, Julia Billen needed new sales to prop up her heating business.

Bringing new hope, new jobs to local economy

While many businesses remain cautious about expanding in a tough economy, entrepreneur Sandy Marsico is bucking the trend. She recently knocked down walls to expand her marketing and interactive design firm.

Entrepreneurs team up to spur local sales, jobs

Elster started Crop To Cup coffee to help support family farmers in Uganda, while Heins' Bean & Body makes health-conscious coffee and tea beverages sold in cans. Both are hoping to jump on the locally produced food bandwagon to get products made by small Chicago-based companies noticed by corporate customers.

Wind energy start-ups seek capital to power up

With momentum building for clean energy, Chicago entrepreneurs Elizabeth Iwanicki and Giovanni Bonomi say demand for their wind turbines is accelerating. Once they seal deals with prospective customers in the United States and abroad, their start-up, Tempest Wind Energy Inc., plans to add workers and move to a larger manufacturing facility, they said. We know we will get the orders. I want to bring this business to Chicago. The whole idea is to get employment here, Iwanicki said.

Chicago’s cutting-edge clean-energy firms seek funding to meet demand

AllCell, launched in 2001 with technology developed at Illinois Institute of Technology, offers a patented phase-change material technology that absorbs the heat generated from lithium batteries, making them safer and doubling their lifespan, Al-Hallaj said. The batteries are currently being used to power electric scooters and bikes, but soon will be in electric and plug-in hybrid automobiles and trucks, he said. The company has been selling to the military since 2008 and currently is working with top automakers, he said.

GreatPoint Energy turns coal into clean ‘bluegas’

GreatPoint Energy takes coal, which Perlman calls the dirtiest, cheapest and most abundant fuel, and turns it into clean natural gas for all sorts of applications. Over time, the clean fuel will reduce global warming while improving health and quality of life in developing countries, Perlman said.

Latest news

Masked merchants re-open Friday at Woodfield Mall after two-month hiatus

A security guard stationed at the entrance to Woodfield Mall was prepared...
- Advertisement -

My view: Bring in the $600 weekly checks

If the federal government pledge to give unemployed workers an extra $600 a week has...

Women founders share war stories to inspire persistence

"You have what it takes to triumph. You may not know it....

Must read

- Advertisement -

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you

Facing the Music: Donations Feed Most Music Organizations in Chicago

Story and photos by Ann Meyer The tip jar most...

State hopes to push use-tax burden to consumers with 2010 tax form

By Claire Hoffman Medill News Service -- April 18 may have...

For resale shop owner, success arrived in multiple locations

By Ann Meyer -- The larger Elaine Krieger's business gets,...